SMART4SEA Conference & Awards
2018
Learn More
SMART4SEA Conference & Awards
2018
Learn More

Hull breach caused small passenger vessel to sink

vessel
Vessel Maximus / Credit: NTSB

On the evening of May 12, 2016, the ‘Maximus’, a 42-gross-ton small passenger vessel, began taking on water while under way near Turtle Bay, Mexico. The four crewmembers could not stop the flooding and abandoned ship into a liferaft, from which a good Samaritan vessel rescued them. The National Transportation Safety Board issued an investigation report on the incident, providing a description of what happened and probable causes.

The incident

On May 12, 2016 the captain of ‘Maximus’ discovered flooding in the galley and alerted the crew. The crew members immediately began inspecting the ship in order to detect the source of the flooding as they were concerned about the stability of the ship. The captain of the vessel instructed the crew to bail water out of the ship and in the meantime the mate dived into the water to check the vessel.

Whilst he was in the water he discovered that a “softball-size” section of the hull was missing at the wooden spray rail at the waterline. The captain determined that the flooding could not be slowed based on the hole in the hull and the limited capacity of the bilge pump, and that he and the crew should abandon ship. After that, the crew went on the top deck and manually launched the liferaft, as the captain of the ship activated the emergency position-indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

Half an hour later a helicopter 6501 arrived on scene and spotted the ‘Maximus’ crewmembers in the liferaft. About 10 minutes after that, the vessel ‘Shannon Dann’ arrived on scene and helped the ‘Maximus’ crew from the liferaft onto the towing vessel. Testing for alcohol and other drugs was conducted. All results were negative and no injuries were reported.

Propable cause

  • NTSB determines that the probable cause of the flooding and sinking of small passenger vessel ‘Maximus’ was a hull breach near the waterline from an unknown cause.
  • Contributing to the accident was the ineffectiveness of the installed high-level bilge alarm system to alert the crew to water accumulating in the hull.

Explore more by reading the full report:

Related Posts


Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Share on LinkedIn0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Explore Our Group Sites:

x

Check Also

ferry crash

Ferry crashes into shore building in Indonesia

An Indonesian-flagged RORO ferry crashed into shore at high speed, while approaching Kendari port, southeast Sulawesi island, Indonesia, in late hours of November 23, the Indonesian Search and Rescue Agency informed.

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies.more information

Close