SMART4SEA Conference & Awards
2018
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SMART4SEA Conference & Awards
2018
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Office of Naval Intelligence reports piracy incidents

vessel protection detachments
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Office of Naval Intelligence published its weekly reports, outlining the piracy incidents occurred at the Horn of Africa, Gulf of Guinea and SouthEast Asia, as well as piracy incidents that occurred worldwide.

Specifically, the Office of Naval Intelligence reported that Pirate and maritime crime activity in East Africa waters is at a low level, with no suspicious incidents reported last week. Namely, no vessels were hijacked, boarded or fired upon, while in November a total of two incidents were reported.

Horn of Africa activity / Credit: Office of Naval Intelligence

As far as the Gulf of Guinea is concerned, pirate and maritime crime activity is at a low level. One boarding was reported this past week, with no further information available. In November a total of twelve incidents were reported, with five vessels being boarded, six fired upon or were attempted to been boarded and one kidnapping occurred.

Gulf of Guinea activity / Credit: Office of Naval Intelligence

Regarding South East Asia, the Naval Office of Intelligence said that, pirate and maritime crime activity is at a moderate level.

In particular, on 26 November, a duty crewman conducting routine rounds onboard a product tanker anchored 13 nm north northeast of Tanjung. Berakit, Pulau Bintan, Indonesia, noticed two damaged padlocks and raised the alarm. The crew mustered and searched the vessel, but found nothing missing, according to the IMB.

In addition, on 20 Nov, an unlit boat approached a bulk carrier 6 nm south of Pulau Nipah, Indonesia, and came alongside the starboard quarter. Crew on deck watch noticed the boat and informed the duty officer. Deck lights and search lights switched on and directed towards the boat. Duty officer noticed eight robbers in the boat. A ladder was seen hooked onto the ships rail. Alarm raised and crew mustered. Seeing the alerted crew, the robbers unhooked the ladder and moved away, VTIS informed. Once the vessel arrived at the anchorage, the Singapore Coast Guard boarded the vessel for investigation.

Southeast Asia activity / Credit: Office of Naval Intelligence

Furthermore, on 25 November, Greek Coast Guard authorities seized 1.6 tons of cannabis and arrested 10 men suspected of being part of a large network smuggling drugs from Albania to Greece and Italy. Three men, two Albanian nationals and an Italian, were arrested on the boat and another
seven suspects have been brought in for questioning, media reported.

Moreover, on 22 November, in Indonesia, pirates hijacked the tug ‘EVER PROSPER’, tied up the crew and stole the barge EVER OMEGA, carrying 3,700 tons of Palm Oil. The barge was later found by authorities, but the cargo was gone.

On Iran, on 21 November, authorities intercepted a boat near Kish Island conducting illegal fishing activity. 

Lastly ,on 16 November, authorities found 26.7 kilograms of cocaine in a shipping container in the port of Kingston in Jamaica. The container had recently arrived from Suriname, local media reported.

The Office of Naval Intelligence publishes weekly two reports for piracy, which can be found below

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ReCAAP ISC reports two piracy incidents in last week

The first involved the container ship 'CPO Norfolk' while it was anchored at South Harbour Manila, Philippines, and the second one the tanker 'Jupiter Sun', while at anchor off Tanjung Berakit, Indonesia.

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